ROSEMARY LAING | poems for recent times | Online Exhibition

PATRICIA PICCININI | Breathblooms and Lighthavens | Online Exhibition

BROOK ANDREW | seeing time | 27 November – 18 December 2021

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BROOK ANDREW

seeing time
27 November – 18 December 2021
Opening hours: 1pm-4pm Sat, 10am-5pm Tue-Fri

seeing time is Brook Andrew‘s new body of work reflecting on and abstracting the concept of time and mark-making. That is, how one perceives and hopes to either manipulate, push against or fall into time.

These paintings were created during 2021 and centre on Brook’s alternative visions of time and mark-making outside the Western art canon. This is a contribution to current challenges and dialogues around decolonisation, which is for him, a progression towards a state of yindyamarra-gunhanha (ongoing respect).

yindyamarra-gunhanha is a term Brook has developed to deal with the often challenging space of museum research and repatriation. His signature black and white patterns are adopted from his Wiradjuri cultural heritage. By doing so, he reinforces the strength and cultural continuity of the Wiradjuri for himself and others.

Image: seeing time installation image (L-R) seeing time VIIIseeing time IXseeing time Xseeing time VII all 2021, mixed media on linen, 235 x 235 cm. Photograph by Andrew Curtis.


Caroline Rothwell ‘Horizon’

26 June – 28 November 2021
Hazelhurst Arts Centre, NSW

Sydney-based artist Caroline Rothwell explores the intersection of art and science. Through sculpture, collaged historical prints and digital animations, Rothwell invites viewers to consider our relationship with the natural environment. Commissioned for Hazelhurst Arts Centre, Horizon looks out from an immediate frame of reference to the infinite and considers future possibilities.

In recent years Rothwell has been making regular site visits to Kurnell in Sydney’s south, the site of first encounters between Europeans and First Nations people on the east coast of Australia. In the Untitled series of works Rothwell slices into several of Joseph Banks’ Florilegium – the original engravings of botanical specimens collected at Kamay (Botany Bay) in 1770. Into each engraving she has inserted a pink tongue painted in watercolour, where its sinuous form disrupts the pages and their historical significance. The tongue is a repeated motif, weaving it way throughout the exhibition.

The installation also comprises a series of sculptural works and found objects, large-scale, digitally manipulated photographs of morphed weed species and video works.

Caroline Rothwell’s most recent exhibition was Bloom Lab at Tolarno Galleries in September 2021.

Image: Caroline Rothwell Blue Cabinet 2019 sculpture with Untitled 2019 works on paper (watercolour on Arches paper collage, on Joseph Banks’ Florilegium a la pope print from copper plate engraving)


Christopher Langton ‘Colonies’

Hazelhurst Arts Centre, NSW
26 June – 28 November 2021

Christopher Langton is known for his sculptures and large inflatables that explore themes around pop culture, video gaming and science fiction. Colonies was commissioned for Hazelhurst, and follows Langton’s 2019 Colony exhibition at Tolarno Galleries.

The immersive installation explores ideas of space colonisation while considering issues around our shared ecology. With obvious reference to science fiction and biology, the gallery is filled with asteroids, meteorites and other celestial bodies along with real and imagined organisms in the shape of viruses, bacteria and fungi.

The sculptures in Colonies were 3D printed, using a machine designed by the artist and built using open source information and software. Three large inflatable works are constructed using patterns and PVC which are then painted and later inflated onsite.

The works are printed using polylactic acid or PLA, a sustainable thermoplastic polyester which is produced from corn starch and sugar cane and is biodegradable.

Image: Colonies installation view by Silversalt Photography, courtesy Hazelhurst Arts Centre