Patricia Piccinini

Exploring concepts of what is “natural” in the digital age, Patricia Piccinini brings a deeply personal perspective to her work.

Rachel Kent notes: “Since the early 1990s, Piccinini has pursued an interest in the human form and its potential for manipulation and enhancement through bio-technical intervention.  From the mapping of the human genome to the growth of human tissue and organs from stem cells, Piccinini’s art charts a terrain in which scientific progress and ethical questions are intertwined.”

 

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Alley,11.15am 2011
Type C Photograph
100 x 160 cm
Bedroom, 10.30pm 2011
Type C Photograph
100 x 160 cm
Library, 8.45pm 2011
Type C Photograph
100 x 160 cm
Sitting Room, 2.30pm 2011
Type C Photograph
100 x 160 cm
Workshop, 7.00pm 2011
Type C Photograph
100 x 160 cm
Installation view – Diorama TMAG : Perhaps the world is fine tonight 2009
Silicone, fibreglass, clothing, human and animal hair, taxidermied Tasmanian devils and wedgetailed eagles, timber, polyurethane, rocks, native vegetation, acrylic paint
Installation view – Diorama TMAG : Perhaps the world is fine tonight 2009
Silicone, fibreglass, clothing, human and animal hair, taxidermied Tasmanian devils and wedgetailed eagles, timber, polyurethane, rocks, native vegetation, acrylic paint
Installation view – Diorama TMAG : Perhaps the world is fine tonight 2009
Silicone, fibreglass, clothing, human and animal hair, taxidermied Tasmanian devils and wedgetailed eagles, timber, polyurethane, rocks, native vegetation, acrylic paint
Installation view – Diorama TMAG: Perhaps the world is fine tonight
Silicone, fibreglass, clothing, human and animal hair, taxidermied Tasmanian devils and wedgetailed eagles, timber, polyurethane, rocks, native vegetation, acrylic paint
Installation view – Diorama TMAG : Perhaps the world is fine tonight (detail) 2009
Silicone, fibreglass, clothing, human and animal hair, taxidermied Tasmanian devils and wedgetailed eagles, timber, polyurethane, rocks, native vegetation, acrylic paint